Student attacks lecturer, other students with bat at ANU

A class at the Australian National University in Canberra has turned into chaos after a student confronted his lecturer with a baseball bat and students rushed to her aid.

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Police spokesman Ben Cartwright says the alleged attacker was an 18-year-old, white male.

“During the class, the student has stood up from his seat with a baseball bat and approached the lecturer at the front of the classroom. Other students in the class have intervened and attempted to restrain the student with that baseball bat.”

Three students and the lecturer were injured in the incident and taken to Canberra Hospital with serious injuries, including one with a broken arm.

Campus security and local police were quick to arrive on the scene.

Police say it is too early to determine the motivation behind the alleged assault, but they say the male was not known to police or intelligence agencies.

Some of the victims are believed to have been of Asian background, but police are not saying whether there is any indication the attack was racially motivated.

The Canberra Times has reported a spokeswoman for the Chinese embassy confirmed consular staff were meeting with the university, but the nature of their involvement is unknown.

The Chinese social-media site Australian Red Scarf says Chinese students were among the injured, which include two female students and one male student.

Ben Cartwright, the police spokesman, has offered few details, but says it appears to be an isolated incident.

“All indications at this stage are that it is an isolated incident. Everything is part of our investigation, we’ll go forward, but, at this stage, I can tell you the facts of the matter are that the student stood up at the back of the classroom with the baseball bat and approached a lecturer, where other students have intervened. And that is how the injuries have occurred.”

ANU student Alexander Vuong says he was due to attend class nearby a short time after the incident.

He says he arrived to find an ambulance and several police officers on the grounds.

“I got to uni at about 9:25, and my class is right next to where the incident happened. So I was sitting in the courtyard taking notes, and I saw about five police officers just walking around interviewing a number of people, as well as about a dozen ANU security people.”

Another student, Freya Willis, who lives on campus, says the incident has left many of her fellow students alarmed.

“I mean, I think everyone’s just really shocked and terrified. I think there’s not a lot of information yet about why it happened or any kind of details. We don’t even really know who was in the classroom or which classroom it was, and so I think there’s a lot of uncertainty and fear as a result of that. It’s very much that feeling of, I guess, an environment that you thought was safe, that you used to learn, like a classroom, then becoming a place of danger. And that’s really unsettling, I think.”

Deputy vice chancellor Marnie Hughes-Warrington has expressed shock over the incident.

“This was an unusual, a very, very unusual, incident in Canberra. We know one another, we care for one another, and our highest priority is to look after one another. Our thoughts are with, of course, the staff and the students involved in this incident.”

The ANU will hold its university Open Day tomorrow and says security will be stepped up for the event.

 

‘We’re a free society’: PM rejects calls to ban the burqa in public despite poll

The prime minister has joined senior MPs from both sides in cautioning against a push to ban the burqa, despite a poll showing half of Australians would support the move.

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“I am not an admirer of the burqa – I worry that it used as a means of oppressing women – that’s my reservation about the burqa,” Mr Turnbull told Neil Mitchell on 3AW radio on Friday.

“Having said that, in this country, we don’t tell people what to wear.”

A Sky News/ReachTEL found 44 per cent of people strongly supported banning the burqa in public places, while a further 13 per cent supported it.

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Of the more than 2800 people surveyed, 19 per cent strongly opposed a ban, 12 per cent opposed, while the rest were undecided.

Mr Turnbull said the federal parliament did not have the power to ban the burqa, but pointed out people were already required by law to show their faces for identity purposes in certain settings including court.

“But fundamentally we’re a free society and people can wear – within limits – what they like.” Cabinet minister Christopher Pyne said his concern about the burqa was that it isolated women from society.

0:00 Hanson enters the senate in a burqa Share Hanson enters the senate in a burqa

“I think that is a dangerous thing,” he told Nine Network on Friday.

“It’s nothing to do with it being Muslim or any other kind of religion for that matter.”

Labor frontbencher Anthony Albanese conceded to being “uncomfortable” when the burqa was worn in public.

“I think people who aren’t from that culture are uncomfortable with it,” he said.

But he also warned bans doesn’t work.

“There’s a whole range of behaviour from people that have different cultures, different ethnicities, different religions that people might not be comfortable with. But that doesn’t mean you go about banning it.”

One Nation leader Pauline Hanson, who wore a burqa into the Senate last week, seized on the poll.

“Perhaps while the government are conducting their plebiscite on same sex marriage, we include the question as to whether Australians want to ban all full face coverings in government buildings and public spaces,” she told News Corp.

0:00 Pauline Hanson defends Senate burqa stunt Share Pauline Hanson defends Senate burqa stunt

Citizenship inquiry: Law Council warns new powers would ‘undermine the rule of law’

The changes are currently before the Senate and will need the support of the crossbench to pass, with Labor and the Greens opposed.

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Along with a new, tougher English test for would-be citizens and an exam on ‘Australian values’, the reforms would give the immigration minister new powers to overturn citizenship decisions from the Administrative Appeals Tribunal.

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“We are concerned that there is an erosion, a steady creep, which leads to an erosion of the rule of law each time you give the minister powers that cannot be overruled or reviewed by an independent umpire,” Law Council of Australia president Fiona McLeod told SBS World News.

Immigration minister Peter Dutton said the new powers would bring citizenship into line with visa laws, where he already has the ability to veto applicants.

“This is really just trying to align the arrangement in terms of citizenship with the laws that exist in relation to granting and cancelling visas now,” Mr Dutton said earlier in the year.

‘Silly’ citizenship decisions

The minister said the AAT had a track record of “silly” citizenship decisions. Cases could still be referred up to the Federal Court, he said.

But Ms McLeod said the AAT was designed to be a check on the power of the executive.

“We don’t know which cases he’s actually referring to when he plucks three or four cases out of the many thousands that the AAT decides each year,” she said.

“Many cases are cases where the government has made the wrong decision or failed to take into account relevant matters.”

The Law Council is among several organisations fronting a Senate inquiry in Canberra on Thursday.

Indian and Chinese community groups will also make submissions.

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Danish sub builder charged over Swedish journalist’s death

The last known photo of Kim Wall shows her standing on the top of the U-C-3 Nautilus submarine in waters around Copenhagen.

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On Wednesday, police announced that, using DNA, they had identified a headless torso found in the area as that of the 30-year-old Swedish journalist.

Danish inventor Peter Madsen, the builder of the submarine, has been charged with manslaughter and could face life in prison if found guilty.

The Danish Emergency Management Agency’s Kasper Groenningiverson says the search is continuing for further remains and Ms Wall’s clothing.

“It seems very accessible, as you can see, but, further down behind you, there are quite a few obstacles and other things that make it difficult to get in there. But we have people along the coast, and we’re helping the police with the search.”

Mr Madsen’s story has changed several times.

At first, he claimed he buried the young reporter at sea after she died in an accident on board the craft.

She had been writing a story about the inventor, who had expressed his desire to launch a space mission.

The 17-metre submarine is one of three constructed by Mr Madsen and one of the largest privately built ones in the world.

The 46-year-old had said at one point he dropped off Ms Wall on an island before being rescued after the 40-tonne submarine sank.

Copenhagen police spokesman Jens Moller says the evidence points to a different conclusion.

“We have secured a hairbrush and a toothbrush to ensure her DNA. We also found blood in the submarine, and there is a match.”

Danish officials say there was metal attached to the body and other attempts to weigh it down, and they say there are signs the limbs were removed on purpose.

The court has ordered Mr Madsen be held on the lesser charge of involuntary manslaughter as inquiries continue and have added the further charge of abuse of a corpse.

Under Danish law, there is no distinction between manslaughter and murder, while involuntary manslaughter describes a killing that is unintentional.

Mr Madsen will appear in court in September.

His defence attorney, Betina Hald Engmark, says he is pleased her remains have been found.

“I’ve only had a very brief moment to talk to my client for now, but I’ll be visiting him later today. But my client and I are only positive about the fact that a clarification has been made, that the body found by the police yesterday is Kim Wall, because then a clarification has been made regarding questions on that part of the investigation.”

The story has made headlines across Scandinavia.

Ms Wall had worked as a journalist in places such as Cuba, Uganda and Sri Lanka.

A candlelight vigil has been held at Columbia University’s School of Journalism in New York in her memory.

 

 

Turnbull against burqa ban, despite poll showing support

Mr Turnbull has joined senior MPs from all sides in cautioning against One Nation leader Pauline Hanson’s push to ban the burqa.

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Senior MPs from all sides of politics have cautioned against a push to ban the burqa, despite a poll suggesting support for the move from the public.

A Sky News/ReachTEL poll has found 44 per cent of people “strongly support” banning the burqa in public places, while a further 13 per cent “support” it.

Of the more than 2,800 people surveyed, 19 per cent “strongly oppose” a ban, and 12 per cent “oppose” it, while the rest are undecided.

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has told 3AW he is not an admirer of wearing the burqa but it is a basic freedom Australians are entitled to.

“It’s, frankly, not something the Commonwealth parliament has the power to do. But I think people in Australia are entitled to wear, basically, whatever they like. They obviously have to show their face when the law requires it for identity — so, when they’re in court or a police officer requires it to check identification, or something like that. But I do worry that the burqa, the full covering … it does appear to me to be a means of oppressing women, so that’s what troubles me about it. But I know there are arguments, you hear arguments, to the contrary.”

Attorney-General George Brandis has told Sky News there are situations where it would be inappropriate to wear a burqa.

“In certain circumstances, for security reasons. But as a general proposition, I believe that, in a free country, people should, subject to standards of public decency and the kind of exceptions that I’ve mentioned, be free to decide for themselves what they want to wear.”

One Nation leader Pauline Hanson, who wore a burqa into the Senate last week, has seized on the poll results.

She has called for including a question on whether Australians want to ban all full-face coverings in government buildings and public spaces in the same-sex marriage postal poll.

Greens leader Richard di Natale has told Sky News the burqa-ban proposal is simple scaremongering and should be ignored.

“What’s the problem here? We’ve got a tiny fraction of our community who decide to wear a particular form of religious and cultural dress. I mean, it’s a tiny, tiny group within our community, and the reality is that what we’ve got is a hate preacher in Pauline Hanson trying to spread fear and division in our community. What for? For her own narrow political purposes. There are so many other important issues as a nation we should be addressing.”

 

 

Danish sub builder charged over Swedish journalist’s death

The last known photo of Kim Wall shows her standing on the top of the U-C-3 Nautilus submarine in waters around Copenhagen.

长沙夜网

On Wednesday, police announced that, using DNA, they had identified a headless torso found in the area as that of the 30-year-old Swedish journalist.

Danish inventor Peter Madsen, the builder of the submarine, has been charged with manslaughter and could face life in prison if found guilty.

The Danish Emergency Management Agency’s Kasper Groenningiverson says the search is continuing for further remains and Ms Wall’s clothing.

“It seems very accessible, as you can see, but, further down behind you, there are quite a few obstacles and other things that make it difficult to get in there. But we have people along the coast, and we’re helping the police with the search.”

Mr Madsen’s story has changed several times.

At first, he claimed he buried the young reporter at sea after she died in an accident on board the craft.

She had been writing a story about the inventor, who had expressed his desire to launch a space mission.

The 17-metre submarine is one of three constructed by Mr Madsen and one of the largest privately built ones in the world.

The 46-year-old had said at one point he dropped off Ms Wall on an island before being rescued after the 40-tonne submarine sank.

Copenhagen police spokesman Jens Moller says the evidence points to a different conclusion.

“We have secured a hairbrush and a toothbrush to ensure her DNA. We also found blood in the submarine, and there is a match.”

Danish officials say there was metal attached to the body and other attempts to weigh it down, and they say there are signs the limbs were removed on purpose.

The court has ordered Mr Madsen be held on the lesser charge of involuntary manslaughter as inquiries continue and have added the further charge of abuse of a corpse.

Under Danish law, there is no distinction between manslaughter and murder, while involuntary manslaughter describes a killing that is unintentional.

Mr Madsen will appear in court in September.

His defence attorney, Betina Hald Engmark, says he is pleased her remains have been found.

“I’ve only had a very brief moment to talk to my client for now, but I’ll be visiting him later today. But my client and I are only positive about the fact that a clarification has been made, that the body found by the police yesterday is Kim Wall, because then a clarification has been made regarding questions on that part of the investigation.”

The story has made headlines across Scandinavia.

Ms Wall had worked as a journalist in places such as Cuba, Uganda and Sri Lanka.

A candlelight vigil has been held at Columbia University’s School of Journalism in New York in her memory.